Space

12:17pm

Thu September 13, 2012
The Two-Way

'All That's Great About America': Nation Bids Neil Armstrong Farewell

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 9:19 pm

Members of the congregation stand at the Washington National Cathedral in Washington during the national memorial service for the first man to walk on the moon, Neil Armstrong.
Ann Heisenfelt AP

Hundreds packed the Washington National Cathedral today to pay their respects to Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon.

Perhaps the most amazing tribute came from Eugene Cernan, the man who followed in Armstrong's footsteps and became the last man to walk on the moon during the 1972 Apollo 17 mission.

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9:58am

Fri September 7, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Volcano Shoots Geyser Of Water Up Into Space

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 9:53 am

Michael Benson

What we have here is a moon — a small one (slightly wider than the state of Arizona) — circling Saturn.

If you look closely, you will see a small splay of light at its top, looking like a circular fountain.

That's because it is a fountain — of sorts. A bunch of volcano-like jets are sending fantastically high geysers of water vapor up into the sky, so high that you can see them in this remarkable print by Michael Benson, back lit by light bouncing off of Saturn.

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5:50am

Fri September 7, 2012
Space

Toothbrush Fixes Space Station Problem

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 8:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a story of a stellar MacGyvering. The International Space Station was faced with a malfunctioning electrical unit and couldn't screw down a new one because the exterior bolts were covered in debris. After two astronauts were stuck outside for hours, they hit on an idea - scrub the bolts clean with a toothbrush. It was a thrifty fix for the $100 billion space station and luckily the toothbrush was a spare. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

12:41pm

Thu September 6, 2012
The Two-Way

From Mars: Curiosity's Tracks, Up Close And From Above

Curiosity's tracks on Mars, in an image taken from the rover.
NASA.gov

NASA continues to share some fascinating photos of the Mars rover Curiosity. Among the latest:

-- An image taken from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter that shows Curiosity's tracks from high above. According to NASA, "the image's color has been enhanced to show the surface details better."

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2:15pm

Wed September 5, 2012
Space

After 35 Years, Voyager Nears Edge Of Solar System

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 2:33 pm

In addition to surveying the planets, the Voyager mission also spent time studying the planets' satellites, or moons. This mosaic image, taken in 1989, shows Neptune's largest satellite, Triton. Triton has the coldest surface temperature known anywhere in the solar system.
NASA/JPL

The Voyager 1 spacecraft's 35th anniversary is proving to be unexpectedly exciting, as scientists gathered this week to examine new hints that the spacecraft is on the verge of leaving our solar system.

Voyager 1 is now more than 11 billion miles away from Earth. It blasted off in September 1977, on a mission to Jupiter and Saturn. But it also carried a Golden Record filled with music and the sounds of our planet, in case it encountered intelligent life as it moved out toward the stars.

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