Travel

9:08am

Fri July 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Report: Beijing, Shanghai Among Worst Airports For Delays

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:42 am

A domestic departures board shows flight delays at Beijing's international airport in January.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

If you think flight delays in the U.S. are bad, try China.

A new report from travel industry monitor FlightStats says China is the world's worst when it comes to delays at major airports.

FlightStats compiled statistics from June for the report, determining that eight of the world's worst airports for flight delays were in China. Beijing and Shanghai topped the list, although New York's LaGuardia had the highest number of flight cancellations.

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6:16am

Thu July 11, 2013
The Two-Way

After Crash, Why Were Asiana Passengers Told To Stay Seated?

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 3:41 pm

Passengers move away from Asiana Airlines Flight 214 on Saturday in San Francisco. This photo was taken by a passenger.
Eugene Anthony Rah Reuters/Landov

3:33pm

Wed July 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Asiana Flight 214: Both Pilots Were Well-Rested, The NTSB Says

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:37 pm

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman briefs reporters on Asiana Airlines Flight 214, which crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The two main pilots on Asiana Airlines Flight 214, the jetliner that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, had each gotten eight hours of sleep the night before their trip to San Francisco, says the National Transportation Safety Board.

The agency's chief, Deborah Hersman, provided that information and other updates to the media and the public on the investigation into the crash that killed two passengers and injured dozens.

Here are details from today's briefing:

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5:10pm

Tue July 9, 2013
The Two-Way

Asiana Crash Trip Was Pilot's First As Instructor, NTSB Says

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:49 pm

The pilot who attempted to land Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco , says the National Transportation Safety Board. Here, a member of the team investigating the crash-landing takes a photo of the plane's landing gear.
NTSB Flickr

3:42pm

Tue July 9, 2013
Business

After Asiana Crash, Pilot Training Gets New Scrutiny

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:40 pm

Much of the training for pilots for major airlines is conducted on sophisticated flight simulators, like this Boeing 787 simulator operated by an All Nippon Airways captain. Pilots are also trained to communicate clearly about problems they may encounter in flight.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Investigators are continuing to examine the training and experience of the cockpit crew of the Asiana flight that crashed Saturday in San Francisco. The pilot at the controls had nearly 10,000 hours of experience flying large jets, but only 43 hours in that particular plane, a Boeing 777. Saturday was also the pilot's first 777 landing at San Francisco International.

Pilots transition from flying one airplane model to another all the time; it's a regular part of the job as airlines add new aircraft and pilots fly new routes or get promotions to piloting bigger jets.

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