Virginia

4:40pm

Wed May 1, 2013
The Salt

Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 5:48 pm

The four cuts at the top of this skull "are clear chops to the forehead," says Smithsonian forensic anthropologist Douglas Owsley. Based on forensic evidence, researchers think the blows were made after the person died.
Donald E. Hurlbert Smithsonian

"First they ate their horses, and then fed upon their dogs and cats, as well as rats, mice and snakes."

So says James Horn of the historical group Colonial Williamsburg, paraphrasing an account by colony leader George Percy of what conditions were like for the hundreds of men and women stranded in Jamestown, Va., with little food in the dead of winter in 1609.

They even ate their shoes. And, apparently, at least one person.

Read more

7:38am

Tue April 16, 2013
The Two-Way

Six Years After Shooting, Virginia Tech Remembers

The memorial Hokie stones at Virginia Tech, erected to honor the 32 victims of the 2007 campus shooting.
Virginia Tech

With so much attention given to the violent bombings in Boston, Virginia Tech is remembering a terrible tragedy of its own today. It's been six years since shooter Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people and injured 17 on the Virginia Tech campus, and then shot himself to death. Today, his victims are being remembered in a series of events.

Read more

2:34pm

Wed April 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Some States Hike Gas Tax; Va. Tries New Route To Fund Roads

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 5:19 pm

Drivers travel on Interstate 495, the Capital Beltway, near Tysons Corner in Fairfax County, Va., in November, just days before the opening of four new express lanes. Virginia is among 19 states that have approved or are considering legislation to increase transportation funding, according to Transportation for America.
Cliff Owen AP

It's no secret that many of the nation's roads are in pretty bad shape. In the latest report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the condition of America's highways rated a grade of D.

Congestion is a big problem, and so is upkeep. Most states rely on gas taxes to raise the money for repairs and new construction, but that funding source is not the stream it used to be, says James Corless of Transportation for America.

Read more

3:28am

Tue April 2, 2013
Law

States Propose Crackdowns On Copper Theft

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 6:59 am

Everything from telephone wire to plumbing is a target for copper thieves, and lawmakers in nearly half the states are considering legislation aimed at making it harder to sell the stolen metal.
iStockphoto.com

The price of copper remains at near historic highs, and that means so, too, does the amount of copper getting stolen.

Everything from telephone wire to plumbing is a target, and lawmakers in nearly half the states are considering legislation aimed at making it harder for thieves to sell the stolen metal.

James City County in southeastern Virginia has seen a spate of recent copper thefts. Maj. Steve Rubino with the county police department says there have been six major incidents since January.

Read more
Tags: 

2:59am

Mon April 1, 2013
Around the Nation

Hootie And The Time Travelers Love The 90s

On April 1, we're revisiting an era of our nation's history that's often overlooked. The 1990s were boom years: grunge was hot, Pogs were cool and the Internet was just beginning. One group in Lynchburg, Va., doesn't just celebrate the '90s — they re-enact it.

Tags: 

Pages