WikiLeaks

12:50pm

Fri July 26, 2013
The Two-Way

In Closing Arguments, Defense Argues Manning Is A Whistleblower

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 6:58 pm

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted from court on Thursday in Fort Meade, Maryland.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was not aiding the enemy when he leaked the largest cache of classified information in the history of the United States, the defense argued today during closing arguments of his military trial in Fort Meade, Maryland, today. Instead, he released the information in an attempt to spark debate about things he found troubling about war and American diplomacy.

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1:44pm

Thu July 25, 2013
The Two-Way

In Closing Arguments, Prosecutors Portray Manning As Reckless

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:41 pm

Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning attach banners to the perimeter fence of Fort Meade in Maryland, where Manning is facing a military trial.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Pfc. Bradley Manning acted recklessly when he released a massive cache of classified information, prosecutors said during closing arguments at his military trial in Fort Meade in Maryland today.

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8:58am

Thu July 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Judge Won't Drop 'Aiding The Enemy' Charge Against Manning

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 12:15 pm

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning (right) is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., on June 25, 2012. His attorney announced that Manning, who is accused of leaking classified information to WikiLeaks, had agreed to plead guilty to lesser charges.
Patrick Semansky AP

The military judge presiding over the court-martial of leaker Bradley Manning has declined to drop the most serious charge against him.

The Associated Press reports that the judge, Col. Denise Lind, said she would allow the government to proceed with a case accusing Manning of aiding the enemy, a charge punishable by life in prison. Lind found the government had enough evidence to support the charges, the AP says.

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10:28am

Fri July 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Russia Reportedly Goes Retro To Keep Kremlin Secrets

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 1:00 pm

A Russian state service in charge of safeguarding Kremlin communications is reportedly looking to purchase an array of old-fashioned typewriters to prevent leaks from computer hardware.
John MacDougall AFP/Getty Images

The Russian agency charged with safeguarding Kremlin communications is said to be opting for a low-tech solution to secure top-secret messages in the wake of the NSA surveillance scandal: typewriters.

Izvestia reports that the Federal Guard Agency, known by the acronym FSO, has placed an order for $15,000 worth of electric typewriters.

Izvestia quotes an unnamed source in Russia:

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5:00am

Fri July 12, 2013
Europe

After WikiLeaks Drama, Kremlin Goes Old School

The Kremlin's security agency has bought $15,000 worth of electric typewriters. A source told a Russian newspaper that after WikiLeaks and the Edward Snowden scandal, the Kremlin decided to "expand the practice of creating paper documents."

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