World

3:00pm

Sat October 20, 2012
Asia

China Criticized In U.S. Debates, But Stays Close

With the final presidential debate on Monday tackling foreign policy issues, surely China will be a familiar topic. It seems every four years, the U.S. relationship with China takes a beating during campaign events. Host Guy Raz speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about why candidates attack China yet presidents always balance their rhetoric.

3:00pm

Sat October 20, 2012
Technology

French Tweet Sweep Shows Twitter's Local Struggles

Originally published on Sat October 20, 2012 4:35 pm

Friday, Twitter agreed to pull racist tweets after a French organization threatened to sue. The company has resisted efforts to police its content. But hate speech is illegal in many European countries, and anti-hate groups there are grappling with how to deal with the challenge of social media.

Read more

4:37am

Sat October 20, 2012
World

Hopes Raised For Girl Shot By Taliban

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 2:21 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
Tags: 

4:05pm

Mon October 15, 2012
Asia

King Sihanouk, An Artist And Architect Of Cambodia

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 3:37 pm

Cambodia's beloved "King Father" Norodom Sihanouk led the country from French colonial rule to independence, through the Vietnam War and the terror of the Khmer Rouge. He died at age 89 of a heart attack Monday in Beijing.
Xinhua Landov

Cambodia's former King Norodom Sihanouk dominated his country's politics through more than a half century of foreign invasion, genocide and civil war.

The monarch of the small Southeast Asian country, who often felt himself better suited to art than to statecraft, died of a heart attack Monday in Beijing, where he was receiving medical treatment. He as 89.

"The King Father," as Sihanouk was known in Cambodia, spent many years in exile in the Chinese capital, beginning in 1970.

Read more
Tags: 

2:51pm

Mon October 15, 2012
The Two-Way

Bosnia Begins Work On First Census Since Its Bloody Civil War

July 11, 2012: A woman cried next to the coffin of her relative at the Potocari memorial complex near Srebrenica. More than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were executed there in July 1995. It was the worst massacre in Europe since World War II.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

Population censuses aren't normally something to get excited over. But for Bosnia, a nation that hasn't counted its own people in over two decades and has its eye on becoming part of the European Union, even a pilot census is of great importance. No formal national count has taken place since before the breakup of Yugoslavia, and the subsequent ethnic conflict that shocked the world.

Today, Bosnia began a two-week test census, targeting around 15,000 people, in order to gauge how prepared it is for an official, nation-wide census in the spring of 2013.

Read more
Tags: 

Pages