World

2:34pm

Fri March 23, 2012
Asia

Along Korea's DMZ, No Sign That Tensions Are Easing

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 3:35 pm

With a new leader in North Korea, the U.S. and South Korea are watching for clues of his policies. But so far tensions have not eased along the demilitarized zone. Here, two North Korean soldiers look across at a South Korean soldier on Dec. 2.
Lee Jae-Won Reuters/Landov

Cold winds blow through pine trees and across nearby mountains. On the horizon are guard posts and cameras. There's little movement, except for wildlife.

U.S. Lt. Col. Ed Taylor, lives and works on the Korean armistice line that has divided North and South for almost six decades. He even sleeps in a bed right next to North Korea.

"I cannot compare it to anything I've ever done. And I say that with 23 years in the Army and two deployments to Iraq," Taylor says.

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1:43pm

Fri March 23, 2012
Asia

For Hong Kong And Mainland, Distrust Only Grows

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 12:32 am

Joyce Wong, a pregnant 30-year-old, takes part in a January 15 protest against immigration laws that allow babies born in Hong Kong to mainland Chinese mothers to be eligible for residency, education and medical care in the territory. Hong Kong residents fear the influx of mainlanders will further burden overtaxed resources.
Joyce Woo AFP/Getty Images

A committee of Hong Kong's handpicked elite will select the territory's new leader this weekend after a hotly contested fight, which has left both the main front-runners tainted by scandal.

It's been 15 years since Hong Kong, a former British colony, reverted to Chinese sovereignty, yet tensions between local people and those from the mainland run deeper than ever.

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11:09am

Fri March 23, 2012
Africa

Mali's Coup A Setback For A Young African Democracy

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 12:50 pm

The leader of the junta that seized power in Mali, Army Capt. Amadou Sanogo, announces a curfew in the capital, Bamako, on Thursday, in this photo taken from television.The coup ousted an elected president who was due to step down after a new election next month in the West African nation.
Issouf Sanogo AFP/Getty Images

The scene in Mali's capital, Bamako, shows what used to be a familiar sight: an African capital in chaos, with drunken soldiers firing into the air and looting government buildings in the wake of a coup.

Military coups were dishearteningly common for people in Africa and Latin America during the 1960s and '70s, as governments fell to opportunistic military men.

But that trend had been slowing in the past two decades, as more and more governments began to hold regular elections.

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10:38am

Fri March 23, 2012
The Two-Way

European Union Slaps More Sanctions On Assad Family

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his wife Asma.
AFP/Getty Images

In effort to add pressure on Syrian President Bashar Assad, the European Union has announced new sanctions on a dozen Syrians, including Assad's wife, his mother, sister and sister-in-law.

"I cannot say to you in strong enough terms how much we are concerned about what's going on in Syria," said Catherine Ashton, the EU's foreign policy chief, according to CNN. "I'm really worried about the escalating spiral of violence there.

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7:40am

Fri March 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Chaos Feared When New Zealand Changes Road Rules Sunday

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 7:42 am

Starting on Sunday, it's the red car that has to yield on New Zealand's roads.
New Zealand Transport Agency

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