World

11:09am

Fri March 23, 2012
Africa

Mali's Coup A Setback For A Young African Democracy

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 12:50 pm

The leader of the junta that seized power in Mali, Army Capt. Amadou Sanogo, announces a curfew in the capital, Bamako, on Thursday, in this photo taken from television.The coup ousted an elected president who was due to step down after a new election next month in the West African nation.
Issouf Sanogo AFP/Getty Images

The scene in Mali's capital, Bamako, shows what used to be a familiar sight: an African capital in chaos, with drunken soldiers firing into the air and looting government buildings in the wake of a coup.

Military coups were dishearteningly common for people in Africa and Latin America during the 1960s and '70s, as governments fell to opportunistic military men.

But that trend had been slowing in the past two decades, as more and more governments began to hold regular elections.

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10:38am

Fri March 23, 2012
The Two-Way

European Union Slaps More Sanctions On Assad Family

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his wife Asma.
AFP/Getty Images

In effort to add pressure on Syrian President Bashar Assad, the European Union has announced new sanctions on a dozen Syrians, including Assad's wife, his mother, sister and sister-in-law.

"I cannot say to you in strong enough terms how much we are concerned about what's going on in Syria," said Catherine Ashton, the EU's foreign policy chief, according to CNN. "I'm really worried about the escalating spiral of violence there.

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7:40am

Fri March 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Chaos Feared When New Zealand Changes Road Rules Sunday

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 7:42 am

Starting on Sunday, it's the red car that has to yield on New Zealand's roads.
New Zealand Transport Agency

6:25am

Fri March 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Not Clear Yet Why Death Toll In Afghan Killings Has Risen To 17

Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales during an August 2011 training exercise at Fort Irwin, Calif.
Spc. Ryan Hallock AFP/Getty Images

Along with the word that U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales will be formally charged with murder today for the deaths of unarmed Afghan men, women and children on March 11, was the news that the death toll had grown to 17. Until Thursday afternoon, U.S. military officials had consistently said that 16 people were killed.

As The Associated Press has reported, officials made the change without offering a public explanation for it.

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2:00am

Fri March 23, 2012
Europe

Portuguese Struggle Amid Austerity Measures

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Thousands of Portuguese workers walked off the job yesterday. They were protesting austerity measures tied to the country's $100 billion bailout from the European Union and International Monetary Fund.

Let's go to Lisbon now. Lauren Frayer reports that among protesters a sense of despair and confusion are more prevalent than anger.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

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